February 24th | Week in Review

2017-02-24-01.png¡Hola a todos! I hope these resources are of use. I know with recent current events it may seem like the future of education is bleak, however, we must remain strong and stay in solidarity. Together we can get through these dark times!

– Check out why these librarians are protesting Trump’s executive orders on Reforma.

— Additionally, Reforma shared about Talk Story Together- Sharing Stories, Sharing Culture. This is a great joint literacy project from the American Indian Library Association and the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association that celebrates and explores the stories of children and their families. Story telling is embedded in culture, and it’s a meaningful way to learn about each other.

– Our Teaching for Change friends shared resources on how to Teach Students to Question the President. They offer some great advice: “We need to remind students that this country has been at its best when people have organized to question and challenge presidents — opposing presidential support for slavery, war, invasion, segregation, and injustice of all kinds. Our students need stories of this resistance to inform and inspire their own activism in the years ahead.”

We Need to Start Telling the Truth About White Supremacy in Our Schools. “If we would start telling the truth in schools, we would not have racism. We could cure racism in this country,” says Jane Elliott in Discriminology.

Teaching Tolerance explored an important question this week: Have We Lost Sight of the Promise of Public Schools? What do you think? Is it true that “We began moving away from the ‘public’ in public education along time ago”?

–Here are Animated Shorts that Celebrate 11 of Mexico’s Indigenous Languages shared with you by Remezcla. Resources like this are a powerful way to counter oppressive misconceptsions: “Consciously or unconsciously, indigenous tongues are often viewed as backward and those who speak them stigmatized, relegated to the margins of official society for refusing to adapt to rules set by colonizers through violence and subjugation.”

Here is why Teaching People’s History is More Urgent. The Zinn Education Project is more relevant now than ever. It’s encouraging to know that “More than 65,000 teachers are helping students learn the truth, and teach outside the textbook.”

— Also from Remezcla is a post on A Journey Through the Empanadas of Latin America which encourages us consider the ways we can teach about identity through food. The author writes, “Empanadas are one of the few foods that unite all of Latin America. Though they come in myriad regional variations – with different doughs, fillings, and cooking methods – at their core they do have a (mostly) common origin story.”

– Lastly, Rethinking Bilingual Education announced the release of their new children’s book, When a Bully is President. “Playful ink and watercolor illustrations support a powerful journey that touches on bullying in the founding history of the US, how that history may still be impacting kids and families today, and ways to use creativity and self-respect in the face of negative messages for all marginalized communities.”

Abrazos
Alin Badillo


Image: Inner time flow resistance. Reprinted from Flickr user ioannis lelakis under CC©.

January 27th | Week in Review

2017-01-27-01.png¡Hola a todos! Happy Children’s Book Day! I hope that the resources this week are of use to you.

– For those of you in higher education teaching about social movements, check out Remezcla’s article, What the Women’s March on Washington Meant For Young Latinx. “Only time will tell. I, for one, will be holding on to the hope and the magic that Saturday gave me.”

Watch 6-Year-Old Sophie Cruz Give One of the Best Speeches of The Women’s March provided to us by Rethinking Schools. “Let us fight with love, faith and courage so that our families will not be destroyed. … !Si se puede! Si se puede!…”

– Our friends Teaching for Change posted Protests: Sites for Education and Organizing. “ … But from what I could see, there appeared to be little conscious effort to use those demonstrations as organizing tools in effective ways that were second nature to us back in the bad old days.”

— Latinos in Kid Litshared the Book Review: The Smoking Mirror by David Bowles. “David Bowles’s Pura Belpré honor book, The Smoking Mirror, is a fast-paced, masterful journey through Aztec mythology and pre-Columbian Mexican history.”

Lee and Low Books announced that Junior Library Guild is a sponsor for Multicultural Children’s Book Day. Andre Thorne VP of Marketing expressed, “We believe that every student should have access to terrific books that reflect the diversity of this nation”

Latinas for Latino Lit shared .R.J. Palacio and Meg Medina Talk Diversity and Children’s Books. Meg Medina shares her view on children and the importance of reading. She says, “I think if you’re in a school that doesn’t have Latino students you probably need my books more than anyone else. Because that may be the best chance those students have to meet and consider a story through the eyes of somebody who’s different than they are.”

– Lastly, here is an Open Letter to Teachers Everywhere shared by Teaching Tolerance. “Imagine the power of educators valuing dissent and affirming what students can achieve rather than magnifying what they can’t.”

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo


Image: Fireworks. Reprinted from Flickr user PsychaSec under CC©.

November 11th | Week in Review

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Hola a todos! This Week in Review is quite long, but I assure you it is full of resources and knowledge that needs to be shared.

ColorLines shared a recent snippet from the show Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, inviting readers to “Watch John Oliver Break Down How School Resegregation Hurts Students.” “Black and Latino children are more likely to attend school with inexperienced teachers who are then less likely to offer a college prep curriculum… [and are] 6 times as likely to be in poverty schools.”

— Lee & Low’s blog, The Open Book, shared a post on “Books as Bricks: Building a Diverse Classroom Library and Beyond,” which offers a list of recommendations for teachers looking to diversify their class and school libraries.

– The Horn Book published an article on “Decolonizing Nostalgia: When Historical Fiction Betrays Readers of Color” by Sarah Hannah Gómez, in which she writes: “Omitting nonwhites from episodic historical fiction and the everyday history that informs our lives today says that the only contribution by people of color to society is conflict. Deleting them from the continuous line of history is a lie that perpetuates this insidious myth. And middle-grade historical fiction has a long way to go to acknowledge this betrayal to readers and attempt to overcome it.”

— The blog, Reading While White, shared a guest post with one of our favorite authors, Yuyi Morales, who discusses “Day of the Dead, Ghosts, and the Work We Do as Writers and Artists.” Morales offers a beautiful discussion of her personal practices related to Día de los Muertos and the implications of its distortion in the general media and children’s books.

– The Facebook page Raising Race Conscious Children shared the article,
Telling Poor, Smart Kids That All It Takes Is Hard Work to Be as Successful as Their Wealthy Peers is a Blatant Lie,” which explores how these students face systemic disadvantages even though they work hard.

— Also, Fundación Cuatrogatos recommends the book Corre que te pillo. Juegos y juguetes, which pulls together 27 games and toys that have existed since the early century in Latin America and other regions around the world

The Zinn Education Project just shared The #NoDAPL syllabus for high school and adults. This resource contextualizes how the current resistance in North Dakota is tied to a “broader historical, political, economic, and social context going back over 500 years to the first expeditions of Columbus” and features the practices of “Indigenous peoples around the world [who] have been on the frontlines of conflicts like Standing Rock for centuries.” “

— From We Need Diverse Books, we learned of the recent article, “The Case of the Missing Books/ 10 Years of Data,” written by children’s book author and artist Maya Gonzalez to highlight the lack of diversity in children’s literature over the last decade.d. “The graph below shows the children’s books that were missing by POC and Indigenous people in the children’s book industry over the last 10 years.”

Lee & Low Books just released Rainbow Weaver/Tejedora del arcoíris. The story is about a Mayan young girl named Ixchel and her quest to create a beautiful weaving from unusual materials.

— Lastly, Teaching Tolerance shared What We’re Reading This Week: November 4, a list of resources for critical and conscientious teaching in middle and high school classrooms.

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo


Image: Street Art. Reprinted from Flickr user ARNAUD_Z_VOYAGE under CC©.

¡Mira Look! Our next theme: Race in YA Literature

"Hopscotch Kids"--Flickr CC user Elvert Barnes

“Hopscotch Kids”
–Flickr CC user Elvert Barnes

As Katrina and I start our next theme of posts, ‘Race in YA Literature’, I want to spend today discussing race and giving you some resources for how to pinpoint and discuss racial stereotyping in text. Without getting too dogmatic, I want to stress the importance of discussing race with our kids. Race is a socially constructed concept used to categorize and create hierarchy among people. There is nothing biological about it, that is just an argument used to make it seem grounded in science and therefore true. Continue reading