February 3rd | Week in Review

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¡Hola a todos! I really hope you find the resources I shared helpful. I know it was enjoyable collecting them.

Latinos in Kid Lit shared a book review of When the Moon Was Ours by Anna Marie McLemore. We haven’t read this one yet at Vamos a Leer, but it looks really interesting: “Teaching this novel opens up the opportunity to research different legends, traditions, and cultural practices in relation to gender plurality and sexuality.”

Fundacion Cuatrogatos posted En busca de un tiempo prometido by Irene Vasco. This is an article about la exclusión educativa en Colombia que tiene profundas raíces históricas, dice sr. Vasco (historical educational exclusion in Colombia as expressed by Ms. Vasco).

— Also, congratulations to Raúl Gonzalez III for winning the 2017 Pura Belpré Award for Illustration! “Raúl Gonzales was born in El Paso, Texas and grew up going back and forth between El Paso and Ciudad Juárez, México.”

–Here is a review of the book Collected Poems 1975-2015 by John Robert Lee, Anansesem advisory board member, shared via Anansesem: The Caribbean Children’s Literature Magazine. With National Poetry month fast approaching, it may be a valuable classroom resource to consider using: “The journey the poems tell is from the young man enthused with the energy of the radical decolonizing spirit of the 1970s…”

— Additionally, Raising Race Conscious Children posted Talking about slavery through a lens of resistance. The article poses some important questions and answers, such as“What do students really need to know about slavery? They need to learn historical details about slavery as a felt experience that both impacts and empowers them.”

– Lastly, Remezcla shared These Anti-Princess Books Give Young Girls Badass Latina Heroines to Look Up To. We couldn’t say it better: “ While Donald Trump may think that a woman’s beauty is the only thing that matters…Two Argentine women in the publishing industry were fed up with that antiquated (and incorrect) notion, and especially with the way it manifests in classic children’s books that paint female protagonists as weaklings who need to be saved.”

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo


Image: Ballet Folklorico Performers. Reprinted from Flickr user HGxxYB under CC©.

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January 20th | Week in Review

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¡Hola a todos! Today’s Week in Review is a bit longer than usual because there were so many valuable resources to share this week. The content has given me hope, and I hope it will do the same for you. Enjoy!

– The Zinn Education Project shared a new lesson plan to teach about the Reconstruction Era titled, Reconstructing the South: A Role Play. While a historical lesson, the themes are relevant today. “This role play asks students to imagine themselves as people who were formerly enslaved and to wrestle with a number of issues about what they needed to ensure genuine “freedom”: ownership of land—and what the land would be used for; the fate of Confederate leaders; voting rights; self-defense; and conditions placed on the former Confederate states prior to being allowed to return to the Union.”

— Our Remezcla friends shared an example of the possibility of reading at a very young age. At Just 4 Years Old, This Latina Already Read 1,000 Books & Delivered MLK’s “ I Have a Dream” Speech. “… the 14th Librarian of Congress, invited the young bibliophile to Washington DC, Daliyah’s story has gone viral.” Daliyah is quite an inspiration to all of us here at Vamos a Leer!

Rethinking Bilingual Education posted the poem “Accents” by Denice Frohman. “My mom holds her accent like a shotgun, with two good hands. Her tongue, all brass knuckle slipping in between her lips, her hips, all laughter and wind clap… my mama’s tongue is a telegram from her mother decorated with the coqui’s of el campo. So even though her lips can barely stretch themselves around English, her accent is a stubborn compass, always pointing her towards home.” This is a great mentor text to use when teaching poetry to older students, challenging the often largely white canon of traditional poetry used in schools

–Here is an introductory lesson plan for Resistance 101: A Lesson for Inauguration Day Teach-Ins and Beyond shared by Teaching for Change and Rethinking Schools on their Facebook page. “To help introduce a history of resistance to injustice… a lesson for middle and high school classes … allowing students to “meet” people from throughout U.S. history who have used a range of social change strategies. The lesson features activists from the 1800s-present.”

Lee & Low Books shared their Book List: 7 Books About Immigration on their Facebook page. “In this book list, we’ve rounded up seven of our titles that are about the immigrant experience, and encourage readers to be accepting of all people from different backgrounds.”

— Additionally, Reforma shared the Huffington Post’s article that explains Why People Are Using The Term ‘Latinx.’ “It’s part of a “linguistic revolution” that aims to move beyond gender binaries and is inclusive of the intersecting identities of Latin American descendants.”

-Last, but certainly not least, Latinas for Latino Lit shared Students, some of them immigrants, write children’s books inspired by their own life’s journeys. “As part of a project called Viajes de Mi Vida — or, Journeys of My Life — De La O and about 70 of his classmates conceived, wrote and illustrated children’s storybooks in English and Spanish that are now in the hands of Salvadoran schoolchildren.”

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo


Image: Ballet Folklorico Performers. Reprinted from Flickr user Mand. under CC©.

 

WWW: Fascinating & Educational Artwork – “Mesoamérica Resiste”

Mesoamérica ResisteThe Beehive Design Collective is a group of artists that voluntarily creates artwork dedicated to “cross-pollinating the grassroots” for use as educational and organizing tools. The graphics are created anonymously and can be used by anyone.

Beehive has released an epic trilogy of artwork exploring globalization and colonialism in the Americas. The third and final installment, released this fall, is truly magnificent. For nine years, Beehive artists worked on this intricately detailed, double-sided folding poster, illustrating stories of resistance. Titled “Mesoamérica Resiste,” the massive map drawn in old colonial style opens to reveal “the view from below, where communities are organizing locally and across borders to defend land and traditions, protect cultural and ecological diversity, and build alternative economies.”  Continue reading