February 3rd | Week in Review

2017-02-03-01.png

¡Hola a todos! I really hope you find the resources I shared helpful. I know it was enjoyable collecting them.

Latinos in Kid Lit shared a book review of When the Moon Was Ours by Anna Marie McLemore. We haven’t read this one yet at Vamos a Leer, but it looks really interesting: “Teaching this novel opens up the opportunity to research different legends, traditions, and cultural practices in relation to gender plurality and sexuality.”

Fundacion Cuatrogatos posted En busca de un tiempo prometido by Irene Vasco. This is an article about la exclusión educativa en Colombia que tiene profundas raíces históricas, dice sr. Vasco (historical educational exclusion in Colombia as expressed by Ms. Vasco).

— Also, congratulations to Raúl Gonzalez III for winning the 2017 Pura Belpré Award for Illustration! “Raúl Gonzales was born in El Paso, Texas and grew up going back and forth between El Paso and Ciudad Juárez, México.”

–Here is a review of the book Collected Poems 1975-2015 by John Robert Lee, Anansesem advisory board member, shared via Anansesem: The Caribbean Children’s Literature Magazine. With National Poetry month fast approaching, it may be a valuable classroom resource to consider using: “The journey the poems tell is from the young man enthused with the energy of the radical decolonizing spirit of the 1970s…”

— Additionally, Raising Race Conscious Children posted Talking about slavery through a lens of resistance. The article poses some important questions and answers, such as“What do students really need to know about slavery? They need to learn historical details about slavery as a felt experience that both impacts and empowers them.”

– Lastly, Remezcla shared These Anti-Princess Books Give Young Girls Badass Latina Heroines to Look Up To. We couldn’t say it better: “ While Donald Trump may think that a woman’s beauty is the only thing that matters…Two Argentine women in the publishing industry were fed up with that antiquated (and incorrect) notion, and especially with the way it manifests in classic children’s books that paint female protagonists as weaklings who need to be saved.”

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo


Image: Ballet Folklorico Performers. Reprinted from Flickr user HGxxYB under CC©.

Save

Save

January 27th | Week in Review

2017-01-27-01.png¡Hola a todos! Happy Children’s Book Day! I hope that the resources this week are of use to you.

– For those of you in higher education teaching about social movements, check out Remezcla’s article, What the Women’s March on Washington Meant For Young Latinx. “Only time will tell. I, for one, will be holding on to the hope and the magic that Saturday gave me.”

Watch 6-Year-Old Sophie Cruz Give One of the Best Speeches of The Women’s March provided to us by Rethinking Schools. “Let us fight with love, faith and courage so that our families will not be destroyed. … !Si se puede! Si se puede!…”

– Our friends Teaching for Change posted Protests: Sites for Education and Organizing. “ … But from what I could see, there appeared to be little conscious effort to use those demonstrations as organizing tools in effective ways that were second nature to us back in the bad old days.”

— Latinos in Kid Litshared the Book Review: The Smoking Mirror by David Bowles. “David Bowles’s Pura Belpré honor book, The Smoking Mirror, is a fast-paced, masterful journey through Aztec mythology and pre-Columbian Mexican history.”

Lee and Low Books announced that Junior Library Guild is a sponsor for Multicultural Children’s Book Day. Andre Thorne VP of Marketing expressed, “We believe that every student should have access to terrific books that reflect the diversity of this nation”

Latinas for Latino Lit shared .R.J. Palacio and Meg Medina Talk Diversity and Children’s Books. Meg Medina shares her view on children and the importance of reading. She says, “I think if you’re in a school that doesn’t have Latino students you probably need my books more than anyone else. Because that may be the best chance those students have to meet and consider a story through the eyes of somebody who’s different than they are.”

– Lastly, here is an Open Letter to Teachers Everywhere shared by Teaching Tolerance. “Imagine the power of educators valuing dissent and affirming what students can achieve rather than magnifying what they can’t.”

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo


Image: Fireworks. Reprinted from Flickr user PsychaSec under CC©.

January 13th | Week in Review

2017-01-13-01.png

¡Hola a todos! I hope your holiday celebrations were blessed and unforgettable. As we start the New Year, I want to take this opportunity to share our excitement here at Vamos a Leer about the many recent and forthcoming titles by and about Latin@s. We’re adding lots of these titles to our TBR list and thought you might want to, too. Enjoy!

Remezcla shared on their page the Top 15 2016 Must Reads From Latin America and Latino Authors. “The list below is 15 of the best books published in the U.S. by Latinx writers this year — it includes books in translation (so many books in translation!) Latin-American writers, and a lot of debut authors.”

– Our Latinx in Kid Lit friends shared their 2016 Favorites List: Libros Latinxs. “This year’s releases offered picture books that we found irresistible, early reader/chapter books that charmed us to the core, and works of fiction and nonfiction sure to thrill middle-grade and YA readers.”

-Also, The Cooperative Children’s Book Center shared their Best 2016 Reading Choices. “CCBC Choices 2016 is a fully annotated listing of 259 books published in 2015 for birth through high school and recommended by the CCBC professional staff.”

— Spoiler, Latinx in Kid Lit shared a sneak preview of their 2017 Titles By/For/About Latinx Reading Review List.

– Lastly, please keep an eye out for future materials by the campaign Queen Girls- Stories of real women turned into fairy tales! Started by two women who weren’t pleased with their children’s reading options, the organization’s mission is “to reach as many kids as possible and distribute donated books [and to partner]with local and international organizations who are fighting illiteracy and empowering girls.” They’re not Latin@-focused, but their protagonists are all people of color and we applaud the organizers’ efforts to break apart the traditional canon of children’s literature!

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo


Image: Ballet Folklorico Performers. Reprinted from Flickr user Natasha Collins under CC©.

 

December 9th | Week in Review

2016-12-09-01.png

¡Hola a todos! Winter break is about to start, so this is is my last post for this year. It is an honor for me to share all of these resources. I can’t wait to see what 2017 brings to all of us. I hope the coming holidays bring you peace, happiness, serenity, and excitement.

– Our Facebook friends Latinos in Kid Lit shared Creating a Diverse Book Legacy: Interview with Culture Chest Founder. “We are a humble startup with big dreams of promoting culture through books, toys, and other avenues.”

– Also, Lee & Low Books shared their top 5: Getting in the Winter Spirit Reading List. I
personally like the book The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.

— For those of you who have been teaching Afro-Mexican content in your class, Remezcla shared the piece, These Afro-Mexican Women Learned the Dances of Their Ancestors Through YouTube. “A 2015 census identified 1.5 million Afro-Mexicans for the first time – an important step toward acknowledging all races and ethnicities that make up Mexico.”

–Here is some advice on Racism, Sexism, And Third Graders, compliments of our friends We Need Diverse Books on Facebook. “For the first time ever, I didn’t have to tell anyone to stop talking out of turn or to come back to the group; they were more engaged in this discussion than anything else we had done all year.

–For those who teach art, Cultura shared Frida reinterpretada. “El periodismo necesita inversión. Comparte este artículo utilizando los íconos que aparecen en la página. La reproducción de este contenido sin autorización previa está prohibida.”

– Lastly, if you have been talking to your students about what is happening in Standing Rock, the Sacred Stone Camp just released DAPL Easement Denied, But the Fight’s Not Over. “The Army Corps has not yet agreed to pursue a full EIS for the entire length of the pipeline.”

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo

Image: First. Reprinted from Flickr user Timon And Pumbaa under CC©.

Save

WWW: Reading Between the Lines

--From Flickr user carmichaellibrary under Flickr Creative Commons

–From Flickr user carmichaellibrary used under Flickr Creative Commons

This month on Vamos a Leer we’ve been talking about how certain groups, histories and moments in time are portrayed in history books, through school lessons and through stories passed down from generation to generation. However, there is a key cog of this wheel that we need to focus on: the news. The news media play an immense role in shaping our opinions by presenting images and events through a certain lens to color not only what is seen by the audience, but how it is imbedded in our minds and how we then turn to question that story or pass it along. Continue reading