¡Mira, Look!: Colección Antiprincesas

Image result for coleccion antiprincesasSaludos todos! I’m back with my weekly Mira, Look posts after a short time off for Spring Break. This month we have been celebrating Women’s History Month by featuring books about the wonderful women found throughout history and within our personal lives as well. This week I’ll be reviewing three books from the Colección Antiprincesas. This collection is meant to feature “grandes mujeres,” or prominent women in history, in order to show that women don’t have to be your typical “princess”; in fact, many of these women were so formidable precisely because they went against gender norms and fought for what they believed in.

The Colección Antiprincesas has received a lot of media attention, specifically through channels (blogs, magazines, etc.) that focus on Latinx literature for children, such as Remezcla’s post, These Anti-Princess Books Give Young Girls Badass Latina Heroines to Look up to. Since these new releases have been talked about so much within the children’s literature community, I thought it was a good idea to contribute my views and join in the discussion. Needless to say, we also greatly welcome the input of our readers in fostering a larger, dynamic discussion about this collection and Latinx children’s books in general!

The first book in the Colección Antiprincesas features Frida Kahlo, a timeless Mexican artist known for her captivating art, but also for her bold, individualistic style and her candid honesty in expressing the most personal aspects of her life, including chronic physical pain and heartbreak. Kahlo was also known for marching to her own beat and has turned into a renowned icon in Latin America and across the world for challenging beauty standards and social norms. Kahlo has been featured many times already on the blog, including Katrina’s Teaching about Frida Kahlo post, Lorraine’s book review on Viva Frida, and Neoshia’s book review on Frida Kahlo.

Although it would seem difficult to bring something new to the discussion after so many resources and books have already been published about Kahlo, the Colección Antiprincesas manages to do just that, thanks in large part to their unique format. Each double-page spread has an illustration that caters to the eyes of younger readers, along with more detailed historical information, discussion questions, and black and white archival photographs. The unusual format of this book makes it a bit difficult to use with younger readers or students reading independently; however, these books are perfect as a resource for teachers. Teachers could draw on the information from these books to teach about these prominent historical figures, incite discussion about the lives and work of these figures, and show images to attract the attention of students of a variety of ages. In addition, these books are monolingual and are written exclusively in Spanish, which means they serve a valuable purpose for bringing Latin American heroines to Spanish speaking audiences. A review by School Library Journal also comments upon this as an attribute of these books—they’re Spanish language books that are easy to get a hold of here in the U.S: “VERDICT An excellent choice for libraries seeking works in Spanish for elementary students, especially where biographies are needed.”

Although the multimedia, patch-work style of the book might make it hard for students reading or working independently, the varied information could lead teachers on a variety of lesson-plan trajectories. For example, one page of the Frida Kahlo book includes the definition of the art term, “surrealism,” along with examples of Kahlo’s work. This could lead teachers to a lesson plan on surrealist art where they compare Kahlo’s work to other surrealist artists, such as Salvador Dali. Another part of the book focuses on Kahlo’s activism fighting for the rights of workers in Mexico. This, too, could lead to an expansive lesson plan on the rights of workers throughout Mexican history, and of Mexican-American workers here in the U.S.

The second and third books of the collection feature Violeta Parra, contemporary Chilean composer and songwriter, and Juana Azurduy, Bolivian guerilla military leader born in the late 1700s. The format for these two books is the same as the first, with simplistic illustrations, historical information and educational definitions, such as “arte popular” (popular art), and “colonias” (colonies). Like with the first book, this information could lead to other related lessons on popular art in the Americas or the history of colonialism and liberation.

One of the wonderful things about these books is that, with the exception of Kahlo, they focus on Latina heroines who are not typically discussed and certainly not included in the classroom – even when discussing Latin American history! Admittedly, I had not heard of Violeta Parra or Juana Azurduy before reading these books. These books also don’t sugarcoat the hardships that these women went through in their lifetimes. Part of the “anti-princess” perspective of these books is precisely that they do not portray women as perfect and pretty; rather these books are straight forward when talking about their hardships, and the illustrations don’t “beautify” the women with western standards of beauty. School Library Journal also comments upon Saá’s illustrations: “The often graphic novel–like art—vibrant, bold colors outlined in black—depicts scenes from the text and enhances the view of the subjects as strong heroines.

Ultimately, these books are an excellent contribution to Spanish-language children’s books accessible here in the U.S., and to any collection of biographies of powerful Latina role models. Putting aside the critique that the unusual formatting could be a challenge for young readers, these books prove an excellent resources for educators looking to teach their students more about underrepresented Latina heroines.

For those of you interested in using these books in the classroom, here are some additional resources:

For those of you interested in learning more about the author and illustrator, here are some additional resources:

Stay tuned for some more great reads!

¡Hasta pronto!

Alice


Images modified from: Coleccion Antiprincesas pages 4, 6, 7, 8, 13

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