Black History Month 2021

Feliz Black History Month!

February first is the start of Black History Month! To help your students learn about and celebrate Afro-Latinos and Black history and culture in Latin America, check out our materials from last year’s workshops centered around Afro-Latino traditions and significant figures from Latin America.

What does the phrase “representation matters” really mean?

Check out this STEM guide that explores the experiences of Dr. Guimarães from Brazil

Check out this film guide to learn more about the Buena Vista Social Club:

Grades 11-12 (in English) Lesson Plan

Want more materials? Check out our other lesson plans and guides from last year’s workshops here.

Mi Papi Tiene Una Moto by: Isabel Quintero

Review of Mi papi tiene una moto

Isabel Quintero provides us with a heartwarming tribute to her father in her latest book, Mi papi tiene una moto (available in English as My Papi has a Motorcycle). This heartwarming tale shares the admiration and love that Daisy has for her hardworking father. In this story, Daisy shares with us about the motorcycle rides that she looks forward to wit her father; the two pass around their home town and greet neighbors, family members, neighborhood pets. Along their journey, Daisy shares the feelings, sounds, and smells that she finds along the way.

El hogar es un sentimiento

que se lleva consigo.

In this heartwarming story, Quintero inspires readers to celebrate and appreciate their homes and their families. For Daisy, her home and her family are always present within her; how do you carry your home with you? Quintero’s storyline and Zeke Peña’s illustrations also inspire us to bring awareness to our feelings and senses. How would you describe your home? How does it feel, smell, sound, and look? Click here to check out the full guide in Spanish.

Review of Tania de Regil’s Un Nuevo Hogar

Tania de Regil’s Un nuevo hogar (4-8yrs)

Saludos queridos lectores! We recently read Tania de Regil’s Un nuevo hogar (available in English as A New Home). This story tells the story of two young kids who share their worries and fears about their families’ upcoming moves to very different places. Although these two young kids do not know each other and do not interact, Regil shares their stories side by side as the young boy and his family plan to move from New York to Mexico City and as the young girl and her family plan to from Mexico City to New York.

Regil parallels the two young kids’ stories to show what each child loves about their home city and as each express their similar fears and hopes about their new homes. This story encourages readers to think about and cherish their families and their homes. What makes your home special to you? This story also encourages readers to recognize their feelings and fears. Big changes, such as moving to a new city in a new country, can be scary for readers of all ages; however, these changes can also be full of hope and promise!

Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism Educator Workshops

Join the Albuquerque Museum and The University of New Mexico Latin American & Iberian Institute for a series of free professional development workshops focused on the exhibit Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism. The works of art in this exhibition epitomize the vitality and expressiveness of modern Mexican art. They were produced in a pivotal period in Mexican history, when the nation sought to redefine itself through political, social, and cultural reforms.

The Women of Mexican Modernism 
Friday, February 19 • 3:30 p.m. MST 
Register at: http://bit.ly/3iul0N5

Identity and Representation Through the Lens of Mexican Modernism 
Friday, March 5 • 3:30 p.m. MST 
Register at: http://bit.ly/38Y1Wnf

Join us! LAII K-12 Afro-Latinidad Workshop Series

Join the LAII for the first installment in the Institute’s first-ever teacher workshop series on Afro-Latinidad! Throughout the series, we’ll discuss a variety of Afro-Latinx cultures across Latin America, a range of spiritual and cultural Afro-Latinx traditions, and a diverse selection of historical Afro-Latinx figures.

We’ll spend our first workshop discussing resources for curriculum about the Afro-Latinx traditions of Bomba (Puerto Rico), Santeria (Cuba), and Carnaval (Brazil). Lessons will include reading, video, music, and podcast components and will include content in both English and Spanish. Participants will receive certificates of professional development and curriculum resources.

Register for tomorrow’s workshop at: https://unm.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUudumvqTssHtNJjUUiJpPW-leXCKp8TH5s

All three workshops will complement one another but can also stand alone so please join us for as many as you can!

Workshop Schedule:

Afro-Latinx Cultural Traditions
Friday, October 23 • 3:30 PM
Register at: bit.ly/3iCmKT0

Significant Afro-Latinx Figures
Friday, December 4 • 3:30 PM
Register at: bit.ly/34qfLHQ

Zooming in on Afro-Latinx Culture in Mexico
Friday, February 5 • 3:30 PM
Register at: bit.ly/3cZ8GSx

For more information or questions, contact us at laiioutreach@unm.edu.

LAII K-12 Educator Newsletter: October


Happy fall, educators! We hope it’s been a great start to a new season for you and your students under these unusual circumstances. In our October newsletter, we share ideas and prepared lesson plans to help incorporate Hispanic and Latinx themes into your learners’ studies this month. ¡Disfrútalo! 

Join Us!: LAII K-12 Afro-Latinidad
Teacher Workshop Series

Join the LAII for the Institute’s first-ever teacher workshop series on Afro-Latinidad! Throughout the series, we’ll discuss a variety of Afro-Latinx cultures across Latin America, a range of spiritual and cultural Afro-Latinx traditions, and a diverse selection of historical Afro-Latinx figures. All three workshops will complement one another but can also stand alone so please join us for as many as you can!

Workshop Schedule:

Afro-Latinx Cultural Traditions
Friday, October 23 • 3:30 PM
Register at: bit.ly/3iCmKT0

Significant Afro-Latinx Figures
Friday, December 4 • 3:30 PM
Register at: bit.ly/34qfLHQ

Zooming in on Afro-Latinx Culture in Mexico
Friday, February 5 • 3:30 PM
Register at: bit.ly/3cZ8GSx

For more information or questions, contact us at laiioutreach@unm.edu.

Current Events

October 12 – Indigenous People’s Day

Indigenous Peoples’ Day is a holiday that celebrates and honors indigenous peoples and commemorates their histories and cultures. This activity guide about Indigenous Peoples’ Day for high school students includes an article from the Smithsonian paired with in-depth questions to assess comprehension. Following is an interactive vocabulary exercise based on the Smithsonian article and another article about Indigenous Peoples’ Day. The second article from NPR gives students another perspective on the holiday and asks them to consider the two articles to complete an opinion writing activity. 

Download the Indigenous People’s Day Activity Guide


November 1 & 2 – Día de los Muertos

Día de los Muertos is a day of commemoration – an opportunity for individuals to come together to focus on their loved ones who have passed away, and to honor, revere, and celebrate their memory. Far from the somber tones of many Western European or North American funeral services, Día de los Muertos is a time of celebration. It is believed that upon these two nights of the year the deceased may return and visit with the living.  In partnership with the National Hispanic Cultural Center, the LAII developed a curriculum guide to provide hands-on art activities and literacy exercises to bring Día de los Muertos to the classroom.

Download the Dia de los Muertos Activity Guide


November 11 – Veterans Day

Veterans Day is a federal holiday to honor those who have served in the United States Armed Forces. Did you know Hispanics and Latinos make up the second largest minority group that serves as active-duty military? This activity guide for middle school students includes an article about Sergeant Leroy Arthur Petry, who received the medal of honored followed by comprehension questions. Students will then watch the medal of honor ceremony paying close attention to extra details the article did not offer. A class discussion follows and, lastly an at home research activity where students learn about a Latino veteran and then share their findings with classmates. 

Download the Veterans Day Activity Guide

LAII Educator Newsletter: September 2020

We hope that the 2020-21 school year is off to a great start. In this newsletter, we share ideas and prepared lesson plans to help incorporate Hispanic and Latinx themes into your learners’ studies this month in addition to other helpful ideas for teaching during the pandemic. ¡Disfrútalo! 
In the month’s newsletter:· Hispanic Heritage Month Activities, Vamos a Leer Educator Guide: The Surrender Tree by Margarita Engle (in English and Spanish), Tech Spotlight: Google Meet, Current Event Activities

SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER (ENGLISH)
SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER (SPANISH)

We also invite you to join our newly created LAII Educator Community Google Classroom for educators and parents to share how these tips worked for you and any other ideas you’ve come up with!

Why Hasn’t the Number of Multicultural Books Increased In Eighteen Years?

Hello, all,

’tis the season, I suppose, to question the paucity of publishers working with multicultural children’s literature.  Yesterday I shared an NPR article with you and today I bring you a blog post from Lee & Low Book’s blog, The Open Book.  While we’re pondering the question here at Vamos a Leer and our readers are musing on it in their living rooms, classrooms, coffee shops, and libraries, Lee & Low went ahead to do a public poll of academics, authors, librarians, educators, and reviews to see “if they could put their fingers on the reason why the number of diverse books has not increased.”  And they didn’t poll just anyone – the people who offer answers in the blog post are among the top minds and writers working toward multicultural literature for children.

It’s a great, albeit troubling, read. Check it out here: Why Hasn’t the Number of Multicultural Books Increased In Eighteen Years?

Cheers,
Keira

 

Do White-centric books sell better?

Hello, all,

I hope the summer months are treating you well.  In case you’re not using your free time to track NPR’s Morning Edition, I wanted to pop in here and share one of their recent articles.  It piqued my interest and may do the same for you.

“Do White-centric books sell better?” So asks a recent article, “As Demographics Shift, Kids’ Book Stay Stubbornly White,” by NPR.  The article aired on Morning Edition on June 25, 2013.  It points out an issue that forms the basis of many of our discussions here at Vamos a Leer – “that when it comes to diversity, children’s books are sorely lacking; instead of presenting a representative range of faces, they’re overwhelmingly white.” Continue reading

For Young Latino Readers, an Image is Missing

Hello everyone!

I thought I’d chime in for a moment and share an article that my colleagues from the Américas Award just passed along to me.  If you haven’t done so yet, check out the New York Time’s recent bit on “For Young Latino Readers, an Image Is Missing”.  The author, Motoko Rich, observes that the typical stories we read nowadays in our elementary classrooms (like the Magic Tree House or the Diary of a Wimpy Kid) are devoid of familiar images for our students of color. The issue of lack of representation in classroom texts is one which our blog constantly tries to redress, but it’s refreshing to see it appear in a mainstream newspaper.

We’re always on the lookout for research or articles like this one, so let us know if you hear of anyone else doing similar studies or tackling the topic!

Cheers,
Keira