February 10th | Week in Review

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¡Hola a todos! This week’s Week in Review focuses on resources that look at questions such as, what does it mean to be a teacher, and what responsibilities does that entail, especially in these times? I really hope the resources are of help to you, I always love gathering the materials and learning with you.

A Talk with Teachers: Revisiting James Baldwin’s Vision for Education is an article shared by Teaching for Change. Here is a snippet of Baldwin’s view of education and teachers, “one of the paradoxes of education was that precisely at the point when you begin to develop a conscience, you must find yourself at war with your society. It is your responsibility to change society if you think of yourself as an educated person.”

– At Vamos a Leer, we feel strongly that it is our responsibility to think critically about the curriculum and literature we expose our students to. This week, Debbie Reese at American Indian in Children’s Literature shared why she does not recommend The Legend of Sky: Spirit Quest by Jennifer Frick-Ruppert. “The author, a non-Native woman writing in the 2010s, is imagining what a Native boy of the 1580s (and his family and members of his tribal community) would do, say, and think. As far as I know, we do not have records of these Native peoples’ speech or thinking.”

Lee & Low Books is having a FREE Upcoming Webinar: Teaching Tolerance February 14th, at 2pm EST time. “Registration is free! … If you can’t join, you can still register to receive a link to a recording of the presentation…”

–Here is some great advice from Teaching Tolerance to Improve Your Teaching by Asking for Student Feedback. “As the teacher, you have to be ready to accept criticism from your students; you have to overcome pride, denial and anxiety.”

We Need Diverse Books shared 15 Authors Discussing Loving Yourself, Immigration to the U.S., and More. At dark times, like this, it is important that teachers help their students love themselves, and empower them by sharing as many resources as possible. This also means that as educators we have to reflect on some of our own unconscious biases that may be impacting our students. One author wrote, “I attended a predominantly white middle school… and some of my teachers seemed shocked that I was smart because their assumption was that kids from my neighborhood weren’t capable, intelligent, and hardworking.”

– Lastly, Remezcla, shared a great article that talks about what Embracing my Afro-Latinx Identity means. The author writes, “Latinos come in a variety of shades, and we shouldn’t be placed into a stereotypical box.”

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo


Image: #NODAPL. Reprinted from Flickr user Victoria Pickering under CC©.

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