January 20th | Week in Review

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¡Hola a todos! Today’s Week in Review is a bit longer than usual because there were so many valuable resources to share this week. The content has given me hope, and I hope it will do the same for you. Enjoy!

– The Zinn Education Project shared a new lesson plan to teach about the Reconstruction Era titled, Reconstructing the South: A Role Play. While a historical lesson, the themes are relevant today. “This role play asks students to imagine themselves as people who were formerly enslaved and to wrestle with a number of issues about what they needed to ensure genuine “freedom”: ownership of land—and what the land would be used for; the fate of Confederate leaders; voting rights; self-defense; and conditions placed on the former Confederate states prior to being allowed to return to the Union.”

— Our Remezcla friends shared an example of the possibility of reading at a very young age. At Just 4 Years Old, This Latina Already Read 1,000 Books & Delivered MLK’s “ I Have a Dream” Speech. “… the 14th Librarian of Congress, invited the young bibliophile to Washington DC, Daliyah’s story has gone viral.” Daliyah is quite an inspiration to all of us here at Vamos a Leer!

Rethinking Bilingual Education posted the poem “Accents” by Denice Frohman. “My mom holds her accent like a shotgun, with two good hands. Her tongue, all brass knuckle slipping in between her lips, her hips, all laughter and wind clap… my mama’s tongue is a telegram from her mother decorated with the coqui’s of el campo. So even though her lips can barely stretch themselves around English, her accent is a stubborn compass, always pointing her towards home.” This is a great mentor text to use when teaching poetry to older students, challenging the often largely white canon of traditional poetry used in schools

–Here is an introductory lesson plan for Resistance 101: A Lesson for Inauguration Day Teach-Ins and Beyond shared by Teaching for Change and Rethinking Schools on their Facebook page. “To help introduce a history of resistance to injustice… a lesson for middle and high school classes … allowing students to “meet” people from throughout U.S. history who have used a range of social change strategies. The lesson features activists from the 1800s-present.”

Lee & Low Books shared their Book List: 7 Books About Immigration on their Facebook page. “In this book list, we’ve rounded up seven of our titles that are about the immigrant experience, and encourage readers to be accepting of all people from different backgrounds.”

— Additionally, Reforma shared the Huffington Post’s article that explains Why People Are Using The Term ‘Latinx.’ “It’s part of a “linguistic revolution” that aims to move beyond gender binaries and is inclusive of the intersecting identities of Latin American descendants.”

-Last, but certainly not least, Latinas for Latino Lit shared Students, some of them immigrants, write children’s books inspired by their own life’s journeys. “As part of a project called Viajes de Mi Vida — or, Journeys of My Life — De La O and about 70 of his classmates conceived, wrote and illustrated children’s storybooks in English and Spanish that are now in the hands of Salvadoran schoolchildren.”

Abrazos,
Alin Badillo


Image: Ballet Folklorico Performers. Reprinted from Flickr user Mand. under CC©.

 

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